Clinical trial for people who can't sleep with CPAP in progress

Photo: Quin Stevenson/Unsplash
BPT - If you are one of the more than 35 million Americans who are estimated to have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), you already know how disruptive it can be to your life. While OSA is one of the most common and serious sleep disorders, the condition is widely under-diagnosed, so the number of affected Americans may be far greater.

What is obstructive sleep apnea?

OSA occurs when the muscles in the throat relax during sleep, blocking normal breathing. This can lead to low levels of oxygen in your blood while you sleep and result in poor sleep, fatigue and sleepiness that can negatively impact quality of life for many. In the long term, OSA has also been shown to contribute to high blood pressure, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and stroke.

Most people diagnosed with OSA are prescribed positive air pressure therapy devices such as continuous positive airway pressure, or CPAP, which can work very well in helping people receive the oxygen they need while they are sleeping. However, because many have difficulty using or tolerating these devices, a significant percentage of the population with OSA remains untreated, undertreated and at risk.

A new option for treating obstructive sleep apnea

Apnimed is a pharmaceutical company working to change the way OSA is treated. The company recently completed a large Phase 2b clinical trial, called MARIPOSA, to study AD109 (an investigational medication which is a single pill taken at bedtime) as a possible treatment for obstructive sleep apnea.

AD109 has the potential to be the first oral medication that treats both the underlying cause of OSA - airway obstruction at night - and improve the daytime symptoms of OSA, such as fatigue. It is designed to treat people with OSA from mild to severe.

Many patients with OSA are unable to adequately treat their condition with existing options, and the team at Apnimed is driven to find new solutions for patients and their doctors to overcome these barriers to treatment. The success of this effort is largely dependent on the dedicated work done by patients and doctors in the community who take part in clinical research.

"MARIPOSA results showed that AD109 improved daytime fatigue, which is an often debilitating effect of poor sleep due to OSA," said Paula Schweitzer, Ph.D., an investigator in the MARIPOSA trial and director of research at St. Luke's Sleep Medicine and Research Center, Chesterfield, Missouri. "For those who cannot tolerate current treatments, AD109 has the potential to be a convenient oral pill that could improve people's quality of life at night and during the daytime as well."

Learn about enrolling in the clinical trial

With the promising results from the MARIPOSA study, a new study is now available for people with OSA.

If you or a loved one has obstructive sleep apnea and you are unable to successfully use or tolerate treatment with a CPAP machine, you could be eligible to enroll in a six-month clinical trial called SynAIRgy.

To learn more about the clinical trial and to enroll, visit: www.SynAIRgyStudy.com.



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